Archive for the ‘Netwoking’ Category

A Look Back at the Year of Influence

Tuesday, December 18th, 2018

Shama Walji, Office Manager and Executive Assistant

As one of Canada’s leading boutique public relations agencies, Brookline is pretty awesome. A team is only as good as its players and we rock each other’s world (in a good way) every single day.

 

 

2018 marked the year of influence and Angela Cabucos couldn’t have said it better at the start of the year when she described influence as, “capacity to have an effect on the character, development, or behavior of someone or something, or the effect itself.”

As we close off 2018, I can’t help but to think how Brookline had such a stellar year.

Let’s take a look:

We Added to Our All-Star Team

Brookline’s team is always expanding and growing with the industry’s finest. This year we welcomed Jenna Hamilton, Ottilie Coldbeck, Nicole Herback as interns, Jas Badesha as PR Assistant, Katie Temple as Account Executive, and Janelle Sacucci as Account Manager.

We Celebrated Some Pretty BIG Milestones

This year, Brookline marked its 14th year in business. We were able to surprise and celebrate the woman who started it all: Shauna MacDonald and the influential leader, mentor, and friend that she is. We also celebrated our very own Sophie Pilon on her sixth anniversary at Brookline, Leanna Kruk for four years at Brookline, and Lisa Libin for three years at Brookline.

… And Some BIG Wins in Influencing the Industry

Here’s the thing, a little side hustle is influential and that’s what good agencies do. Brookline had some remarkable wins in 2018 through influencing our community.

Ahem – to mention just a few:

Internal Team Wins

A major component of Brookline’s culture is celebrating the team through quarterly fun days and team workouts, thank tanks, mentorship programs, pillar awards, this year’s influencer award, and of course promotions. These rock stars were promoted in 2018:

  • Leanna Kruk to Group Director
  • Sophie Pilon to Account Director
  • Shama Walji to Office Manager and Executive Assistant
  • Angela Cabucos to Senior Account Manager
  • Amanda Kemsley to Account Manager
  • Jas Badesha to Account Coordinator
  • Jenna Hamilton to PR Assistant
  • Ottilie Coldbeck to Senior Intern

In 2018, there was so much to celebrate – I cannot wait to see what other amazing accomplishments will be in the books for 2019.

 

 

Shama Walji is the Office Manager and Executive Assistant at Brookline Public Relations. With over nine years of customer relations and administrative management experience, Shama brings a creative and enthusiastic ability to be Brookline’s main point of contact for all things administrative.

Generation Z: Forget Everything You’ve Learned About Millennials

Thursday, September 6th, 2018

Amanda Kemsley, Account Manager 

 

Move over Millennials, we have a new target market in town: Generation Z (A.K.A Gen Z). The marketing stream has been hyper-focused on millennials for awhile, but now enters the next generation to be in the spotlight, and not one to be ignored. Born in the mid-nineties, Gen Z has grown up in the digital age, with ubiquitous internet access and bred to navigate the world with ease. Making up approximately 17 per cent of Canada’s population, it is a generation worth watching and brands are noticing.

For many, especially marketers, it seems obvious that digital would be the only channel worth connecting with this generation. But, do we have it all wrong? If you were to guess the generation that prefers print books over digital ones, enjoys shopping at brick-and-mortar stores and as few as 14 per cent own a smartwatch, you probably wouldn’t associate this with Gen Z. But those are Gen Z preferences, including characteristics of being more inclusive, accepting and risk-adverse.

There’s a fine balance with this generation between digital and traditional. Even though their lives revolve around a digital sphere, they tend to ignore the constant stream of ads and messaging and turn away from the digital noise. Information consumption for Gen Z is not a one-size-fits-all approach. Engaging with them digitally isn’t enough. To help accurately market to Gen Z, it is important to differentiate this generation from others. Here are a few things we know that sets them apart from their millennial predecessors:

 

They are digital AND non-digital.  

They haven’t forgotten traditional mediums such as TV and paperback books and they easily straddle between digital and non-digital. While, Gen Z does receive most of its information from social media, it’s not solely digital for their means of information.

Key takeaway: e-commerce strategies are important for marketers, but don’t exclude in-store service – focus on the shopping experience.

 

 

Instant gratification is everything.

Thanks to social media and technology, the retrieval of information can happen whenever and wherever, making immediate gratification a must. Convenience is important here, more than any generation before. With same-day shipping, Google at your fingertips and apps to keep you from having to stand in line, patience is not a virtue.

Key take-away: this is not to be mistaken as laziness, but rather efficiency and simplicity – there’s no need to overcomplicate a message or product.

 

 

Gen Z is realistic and cautious about finances.

They grew up alongside the recession and were taught to be mindful with their money, even more so than millennials. Being internet-savvy, this generation knows how to find a great deal and get the most out of their money. They can find hundreds of similar products, so what makes yours stand out?

Key takeaway: it’s not enough to be price conscious, this generation is also looking for the value add.

 

 

Gen Z is not just an exaggerated version of millennials. They are unique, open-minded, money-conscious and resourceful. It is an important group of potential customers, clients, employees and employers who can help influence the future. As a brand or company, understanding these characteristics will help to accurately deliver products, services and experiences to this up-and-coming generation.  Welcome Gen Z, we’re glad you’re here!

 

Amanda is an Account Manger at Brookline Public Relations. She has an insatiable appetite for exploring – ironically since she doesn’t like getting lost. She flourishes on bringing broad-minded, creative ideas to the table and trying things outside of the norm – perhaps these are millennial traits?

 

Event planning: Details, Details Details!

Thursday, August 10th, 2017

Amanda Kemsley, Account Specialist 

It’s an age old saying for many aspects in life, particularly one that could be said about event planning; hope for the best and prepare for the worst. As PR professionals, we prepare and think about every possible scenario, trying to avoid the unavoidable. But, we don’t hope for the best, we plan for it. Below are a few considerations to think of when planning an event and ensuring everything goes off with a bang:

  1. Purpose

Having a clear objective from the beginning will guide all aspects of planning, help to measure results and ensure success of the event. Is the event to launch a product or service? Is it to introduce a new brand/company? Why are you (or the client) holding the event, and what do you want to achieve?

 

  1. Budget

Once you’ve established the focus of your event, do your research and estimates costs to create a budget you can reasonably work within. If you are given a budget from the client, break it down into line items to give yourself an idea of what can fit into the budget. There are often unforeseen costs so don’t forget to account for contingency.

 

  1. Know your audience

This goes for both guest and media invites. Invite guests that share an interest in your event, product, service, etc. Reach out to media appropriately and ensure you’re pitching a reporter with a beat that coincides with your event’s purpose. Making sure to research and select the right people will help create a longstanding relationship with event attendees and media contacts.

 

  1. Timeliness

Conduct an environmental scan for the time, and area of your event. Take a look at other events happening in the city and pick a suitable day and time that will not conflict with your event. You don’t want to compete with other events that have a similar targeted guest list.

 

  1. Make a list and check it twice

In PR we love lists, but creating a work back schedule will help ensure you don’t miss important elements for your event. Organizing all details into once place will give you the chance to see how your plan is progressing. A run of show is also a great way to envision your event from start to finish and will give you the opportunity to recognize any missing elements.

  1. Venue Selection

Align your event theme with your venue selection. Having consistency in your theme and venue will add to the event and leave a lasting impression. Look at the big picture and choose a venue that can accommodate your guest list, food and beverage options, fits your budget and encompass the atmosphere you’re aiming for. It’s also important to consider accessibility of the venue, convenience for guests and if necessary, contingency plan for weather. If you are on a limited budget, look for a venue that can check off multiple services including catering, entertainment and AV – bundling vendors can help save costs.

 

  1. Takeaways

Leave a lasting impression on your guests with a simple and thoughtful takeaway gift. Practical or unique gifts are usually a hit, keeping in mind it should always tie back to your event theme.

 

 

Once your event is over, record key learnings and regroup with your client to look back, review and measure against your objective(s). Key learnings and takeaways are great to have on hand the next time you plan an event. Events require a lot of foresight, but if planned and executed well, they can be the perfect opportunity to engage with your audience, share a message, secure earned media and more!

Amanda is an Account Specialist at Brookline Public Relations. She has an insatiable appetite for exploring – ironically since she doesn’t like getting lost. She flourishes on bringing broad-minded, creative ideas to the table and trying things outside of the norm.